Other Wildlife

Your 2019 sightings

Happy New Year

Many thanks to all observers that have already submitted their records for 2019, both through Birdtrack and Devon Birds. This is much appreciated.

For other records please could observers submit their sightings by 31st January.

Guidelines and links to recording forms can be found here https://www.devonbirds.org/birdwatching/recording/guide_to_record_submission

Please send your records to Karen Sims data.manager@devonbirds.org and any descriptions to Kevin Rylands recorder@devonbirds.org

Best wishes and good birding for 2020

Posted January 10th at 10:53 pm by Pete Aley in General Birding

Sightings Page Guidelines

We welcome contributions from Devon Birds members and the general public. Please follow the guidelines on this page if you have something you would like to post on the blog, remembering to use the relevant subject.

  

For help with ID email photos to id@devonbirds.org.

Posted January 8th at 9:12 pm by Pete Aley in General Birding

Dawlish Warren

Continued erosion at Dawlish Warren means visitors are reminded to take extra care when visiting. Access along the site, to and from the bird hide and Warren Point, is via the beach only, with a risk of being cut off for a period either side of high water! Further information is available on the Teignbridge District Council website:
 
 
 

Posted November 9th, 2018 at 11:08 am by Mike Daniels in General Birding

Membership

If you follow our Blog but are not currently a member of Devon Birds please consider joining Devon Birds to help us with the upkeep of running the website and this service as well as our valuable conservation work .

Posted October 10th, 2016 at 9:14 am by George & Julia Harris in General Birding

Thursday 20th June 2019

Plymwoods

Plenty of Fallow Deer and fawns seen on the edges of Plym Woods

Fallow Deer Fawn               
Fallow Deer Fawn

Posted June 20th, 2019 at 10:49 am by Greg Bradbury in Other Wildlife

Insects at South Milton

At last a bit of sunshine that brings the insects out to play. A ruby-tailed wasp sometimes called a cuckoo wasp. It lays it's eggs inside it's hosts nest usually mason bees or other solitary bees. When the eggs hatch the larvae eat the hosts new born. The adults have a very hard cuticle so they can withstand the stings of the angry host bees if they encounter them.

A Nomad Bee sometimes called a cuckoo bee. They resemble a wasp and lay their eggs in the nests of other bees. They steal the pollen in their hosts nests. After a Nomad larva’s first moult, they are able to use their large sickle-shaped mouth parts to destroy the host’s resident egg or grub, meaning all of the stored pollen is theirs for the taking.

Ruby-Tailed waspNomad waspBlack and yellow Longhorn beetle
Ruby-Tailed wasp                                   Nomad wasp                        Black and yellow Longhorn beetle

Posted June 20th, 2019 at 5:55 am by Richie Moore in Other Wildlife

Tuesday 18th June 2019

Saunton Sands

Good example of one of nature's recylers. Sandhoppers recycling a stranded Barrel Jellfish.


Posted June 18th, 2019 at 12:06 pm by Rob Jutsum in Other Wildlife

Saturday 15th June 2019

15-06-19 Roborough Down

Not much in the way of birdlife, but two notable Butterflies, the Green Hairstreak and the Small pearl-bordered fritillary

Green HairstreakSmall pearl-bordered fritillary
Green Hairstreak                              Small pearl-bordered fritillary

Posted June 15th, 2019 at 4:15 pm by Greg Bradbury in Other Wildlife

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