Other Wildlife

Your 2019 sightings

Happy New Year

Many thanks to all observers that have already submitted their records for 2019, both through Birdtrack and Devon Birds. This is much appreciated.

For other records please could observers submit their sightings by 31st January.

Guidelines and links to recording forms can be found here https://www.devonbirds.org/birdwatching/recording/guide_to_record_submission

Please send your records to Karen Sims data.manager@devonbirds.org and any descriptions to Kevin Rylands recorder@devonbirds.org

Best wishes and good birding for 2020

Posted January 10th at 10:53 pm by Pete Aley in General Birding

Sightings Page Guidelines

We welcome contributions from Devon Birds members and the general public. Please follow the guidelines on this page if you have something you would like to post on the blog, remembering to use the relevant subject.

  

For help with ID email photos to id@devonbirds.org.

Posted January 8th at 9:12 pm by Pete Aley in General Birding

Dawlish Warren

Continued erosion at Dawlish Warren means visitors are reminded to take extra care when visiting. Access along the site, to and from the bird hide and Warren Point, is via the beach only, with a risk of being cut off for a period either side of high water! Further information is available on the Teignbridge District Council website:
 
 
 

Posted November 9th, 2018 at 11:08 am by Mike Daniels in General Birding

Membership

If you follow our Blog but are not currently a member of Devon Birds please consider joining Devon Birds to help us with the upkeep of running the website and this service as well as our valuable conservation work .

Posted October 10th, 2016 at 9:14 am by George & Julia Harris in General Birding

Thursday 29th March 2018

Axmouth dead birds

(In reply to the post below.) As many are experiencing in the field, larger numbers of dead birds are being found recently, following the poor weather conditions. Having died of natural causes, the heads are often of interest to skull collectors who are perfectly within their rights to further their collections and knowledge. Such collections will ultimately end up adding to natural history collections and in the meantime are put to excellent use in identifying mystery skulls the public may find. Some of the best young naturalists I know are building perfectly-catalogued collections and have huge passion for the birds they're studying.

When a ringed bird is found on the strandline, similarly the ring is often retrieved by cutting through the tarsus or tibia, again perfectly legal when performed on a naturally dead bird. I can't speak for certainty on the Axmouth birds, but I hazard a guess these birds were ringed birds, whose rings were removed as well as the heads for skull collections.

While I agree the remains should be left available to scavengers, I'd personally prefer if collectors would leave remains in more natural layout in secluded places as opposed to unnatural rows in public places.

Posted March 29th, 2018 at 10:32 pm by Lowell Mills in Other Wildlife

Sunday 25th March 2018

Yarner Butterflies

First Butterflies for me today with Comma and a few Brimstones around Yarner Woods, the warm weather has brought them out of hibernation.

Comma
Comma

Posted March 25th, 2018 at 5:54 pm by Simon Thurgood in Other Wildlife

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