Devon Bird Sightings: Other Wildlife from 1st–7th September 2017

Scarce Breeding Birds - important posting guidelines

Please do not post any information about scarce or rare breeding species. They may be vulnerable to persecution or disturbance. 

The exception is information on these species at well known sites (e.g. Broadsands for Cirl Bunting and Aylesbeare for Dartford Warbler) or birds which are obvious migrants away from breeding sites.

If in any doubut, please don't post but report your sighting to the county recorder asap. Site editors cannot commit to editing posts which breach these guidelines, and the whole post may be removed or not admitted.

Further details can be found in the link below, but note, Wood Warbler is now also included as a scarce breeder:-

https://www.devonbirds.org/news/bird_news/rare_breeding_species

Posted April 15th at 3:02 pm by Pete Aley in Bird News

Membership

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Posted October 10th, 2016 at 9:14 am in Bird News

Friday 1st September 2017

Re European Hornet

With regard to Rob Jerrard's earlier post: yes this does appear to be a European Hornet - a rather beautiful looking insect (certainly no more evil looking than bees or any other insect!). Not sure if you were joking about leaving quickly Rob,  but I have never felt threatened by the presence of Hornets, even when observing them at a nest, finding them far more approachable than other wasp species. [NB Avoid confusion with the larger, darker, invasive and more agressive Asian Hornet. ]

Posted September 1st, 2017 at 8:55 pm by Dave Holloway in Other Wildlife

Hornet

Whilst at a honey farm photographing butterflies I came upon this evil looking thing which as far as I can ascertain is a European Hornet (The sooner we leave the better).  Any experts on hornets who can confirm?

  Hornet eating bee, having biten its head off.

Hornet eating bee, having biten its head off.

Ed. - yes, it's a Hornet Vespa crabro

Posted September 1st, 2017 at 5:20 pm by Rob Jerrard in Other Wildlife

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